How to photograph a cascading bouquet

Every wedding that I had in July included a cascading bouquet! I love working with these types of bouquets, but they can be trickier to photograph. You will need to approach styling a bit differently for flat lay photos (typically taken during bridal details) and you will need to make sure it's turned a particular way when the bride is holding it. 

Here's how I approach cascading bouquets!

Jordan Brittley - Fine Art St Louis Wedding Photographer | Floral Design by Always in Bloom | Venue - The Ritz-Carlton St Louis, MO

Jordan Brittley - Fine Art St Louis Wedding Photographer | Floral Design by Always in Bloom | Venue - The Ritz-Carlton St Louis, MO

Flat lay photos

You can put almost any bouquet flat on the ground and it will look good! But this isn't true for cascading bouquets. They are obviously heavier on the cascading side, which causes the bouquet to turn over and expose the stems. If you want to do a flat lay of the cascading bouquet, try propping it up just a little with a small lens. Hide the lens so that you can't see it under the bouquet and there you go!

Floral Design by Always in Bloom in St Louis, MO | St Louis Club in Clayton, Missouri | Wedding Photography by Jordan Brittley

Floral Design by Always in Bloom in St Louis, MO | St Louis Club in Clayton, Missouri | Wedding Photography by Jordan Brittley

Tip: Don't forget to turn the bouquet so that the cascade is to the side of your photograph. This will create more depth and interest.  

couple photos

If the couple is facing you, you won't encounter any problems with a cascading bouquet. It's when the couple turns to face each other that your problems will begin.

Cascading bouquets can be heavy, so try to mix up your direction (aka relaxed, natural posing) so that the bouquet doesn't get too heavy to hold. Direct them into poses that will naturally point the front of the bouquet toward you.

If you want to take a photo from the side, just ask your bride to turn the bouquet slightly towards you. You will still be able to see the greenery without highlighting the numerous stems that made the bouquet possible.

Best Springfield MO Floral Design by He Loves Me Flowers | Dress by Norman's Bridal Springfield, Missouri | Weathered Wisdom Barn in Preston, Missouri

Best Springfield MO Floral Design by He Loves Me Flowers | Dress by Norman's Bridal Springfield, Missouri | Weathered Wisdom Barn in Preston, Missouri

Candid photos

I describe myself as a fine art and documentary photographer. This is because I love styling images and creating art using the emotion and beauty of a wedding day, but I also know when I need to step back and let the moment speak for itself. You won't need to worry about the bouquet as much during candid photos (ceremony, reception) because it wouldn't be the best for your bride. 

Floral Design by Flowers & Home | Dress & Veil by Norman's Bridal | Garvan Woodland Gardens in Hot Springs, Arkansas

Floral Design by Flowers & Home | Dress & Veil by Norman's Bridal | Garvan Woodland Gardens in Hot Springs, Arkansas

For example, she doesn't want her photographer walking to the front of the aisle to adjust her bouquet. Don't do that. Instead, let the moments play out. Now, if she is just walking back to the venue from sunset photos and a slight turn of the bouquet would make the photo, just say something! 

Cascading bouquets are beautiful and elegant. By adding these tips to your camera bag, I hope that you will have more room for creativity on wedding days!

If you want to join the discussion, click on over to the #askjordanbrittley facebook group

Join the Facebook Group!

for brides | for photographers