10 Things I Learned from a 3 Wedding Weekend

Isaac and I spent the weekend traveling the state: 3 days, 3 weddings, 2 cities, 1 newborn, 0 sleep, and so many coffees. We made lots of memories, enjoyed the adventure as a family of 3, and served our clients well. It's easy to write that sentence but there were a lot of things that I learned or was reminded about this weekend. Today I am sharing 10 things I learned from our 3 wedding weekend. 10 Things I Learned from a 3 Wedding Weekend - The Jordan Brittley Blog

Make a mess with the bridal details

I always try to clean up everything in between bridal details and it takes way too much time. This weekend I let the mess happen and it worked so great! I was able to move quickly and even be a little more creative with the extra time.

When you are doing this, make sure you are still taking care of the details and keep an eye on those rings!

Have someone help with the bridal details

Isaac helped me with the bridal details this weekend and I felt like it changed everything. It's nice when you have someone available to hand you a lens, a peony, or the necklace. He was able to start cleaning up while I was still shooting or moving on to the next thing!

Book the hotel in advance

I always think that if I book the hotel at the last minute then we will get a great deal. For some reason I think this will make things simple. I will be changing this in the future because booking it last minute when the Cardinals were in KC was a bad move. Everything was booked up! Once we finally found a hotel on the Wednesday before the weddings, we had to stay 1 hour from two of the weddings.

Backup everything in 3 places

We backed up everything in at least 3 places this weekend: 2 computers and an external hard drive. It's important to keep these three things in different places. While we have never had anything stollen, it's always a possibility. By putting the backups in different places, you can avoid losing all the images for good.

Give the bride some breathing room

Wedding are often stressful for the bride and I think it's the photographer's job to take care of that. Create a relaxing environment when you have the opportunity. Ask the groom to take her away during couple photos for a little bit so she can just be in her wedding for a minute.

Encourage the bride when things don't go as planned

Something always happens on a wedding day. Whether it's hair and makeup running long, a hovering family member during couple photos, or the ceremony not being set up 30 minutes before the wedding, something always happens on the wedding day. Do everything you can to encourage the bride to relax and enjoy the day!

Hit the reset button creatively speaking

One of the biggest challenges I have faced in double wedding weekends is approaching each day in a new way. This weekend I was able to hit the reset button on my creativity by doing the things that fire me up: listening to music during bridal details, arriving early, and lots of baby cuddles between weddings.

Print the Timelines + Family List

I typically use my phone to keep track of the timelines and the family list, but this weekend it was so nice to have everything printed.

Take one day at a time

In the days leading up to the three weddings, I overwhelmed myself with the weekend. I have high expectations for myself and I want to serve my clients well! Isaac told me that I just needed to take one day at a time. By following his wise advice, I was able to fully serve each of my couples and not be distracted by what was to come.

Go over everything with your second shooter in advance

Isaac and I talked timeline, family photos, and details for the day on our drive to each wedding. This saved us time and helped us work together as a team. Give yourself time to walk through parts of the wedding before your coverage begins and talk through what angles you each want to cover.


Have you shot a double or triple wedding weekend? What challenges did you face and what did you learn from the adventure?

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